Monthly Archives: October 2016

Busy

I’ve gotten settled into the routine of the school year, and as usual, I’m busy,  I’m in a hurry, and it feels wrong to take a break.  While the busy-ness and hurried-ness seem productive, it’s a lie.  Doing more and more, faster and faster, is not getting me anywhere!

I think I’ll remind myself of a few things, try to apply them, and maybe enjoy life more.

  • I’m going to purposely avoid rushing, hurrying, and haste.
  • I’m going to revisit my priorities and be sure the things that are truly important are scheduled.
  • I’m going to more carefully consider my opportunities and say “no”more often.

 

Homework Due 11/1 and 11/2

And the winners are…

Keep reading!

Math for the Middle Grades – Lessons 10, 23, 28.  Lesson 22 is optional.  We’ll work on lessons 24-27 in class.  Also due on 11/2 is Homework #9:  Mixed Review, to be turned in without scoring.

Lesson 28 is the start of our work on decimals – just tenths and hundredths for now.  Students were encouraged to think in terms of money.

Math 76  – Lessons 29-32 and Test 4.

Algebra 1/2 – Lessons 36-40

Algebra 1 – Lessons 36-40

Algebra 2 – Lesson 36-40

Geometry – Section 5:3

The winners have been chosen.  To claim your prize, valued at somewhere between zero and a million dollars, email Mrs. Sands and let her know you saw your name on the list of winners!  You must email to claim your prize.  Prizes not claimed by midnight on Sunday, 10/30, will be awarded to someone else.  Check back on Monday to see if any new awards were made!

If you were not able to turn in your tickets, email and tell a good story about why your tickets didn’t make it into the drawing.  Your efforts might be rewarded.

 

 

Opinions

Dixon Ticonderoga pencils are the best pencils in the world.

Recipes are merely suggestions.

Plants should stay outside.

These are a just a few of my many opinions.  I have more opinions than I have people to listen to them.  Sharing my opinions with you makes me happy!  Leave a comment to suggest a topic, share your opinion about something, or ask a question so I can give my opinion about it.  Keep it positive and appropriate.  I’ll respond to as many as possible. Thanks.

 

 

Homework Due 10/25 and 10/26

For the past few weeks, I have handed out tickets to be entered in a drawing mid-semester. Each week each student gets a raffle ticket if he or she has everything turned in.  On 10/25 and 10/26 the tickets will be collected and there will be a drawing for prizes valued somewhere between zero and million dollars (probably closer to zero).  Winners will be announced here! In order to claim your prize, email me and tell me you saw your name here.

Be sure to email Mrs. Sands if you have any questions about your homework!

Math for the Middle Grades:  Lessons 19-21.  Also due on 10/19 is “Chapter 1 Test” in the Homework (HW) section of your binder.   It’s one sheet of paper.   Be sure to show your work. If necessary, attach another sheet of paper and clearly label each problem worked on the paper. This assignment is to be completed at home, but not scored.  Turn in the Chapter 1 Test unscored.  This assignment may be completed in more than one sitting, open book.  If you are struggling, look back in chapter 1 for similar problems.  If you are still having a hard time, email me.

Math 76:  

  • Lesson 26 practice and odds (if you haven’t done it yet)
  • Lesson 27 practice and odds
  • Lesson 28 practice
  • Investigation 1.  Extensions at the end of the Investigation are extra credit.  These may be completed at any time during the semester.  Extra credit will be awarded if you have completed all or nearly all the regular assignments.  If you have a significant number of overdue assignments, you will be better off finishing those, not trying to earn extra credit.
  • Before class on 10/26 please read the next four or five lessons.  You don’t need to completely understand the lessons.  Just read them.  Plan to read lessons before class every week.  Sometimes reading to an audience is helpful.  Try reading to your dog, your teddy bear, or a doorknob.

Algebra 1/2:  Lessons 31-35, Test 6

Algebra 1:  Lessons 31-35, Test 6

Algebra 2:  Lessons 31-35, start on Test 6 and turn it in on 10/26 or 11/2

Geometry:  Sections 5:1 and 5:2, and test 4.  Section 5:2 is very long.  Feel free to take one pass through this section doing about half the problems, then, if time allows, go through the section again to finish it.

Pray

The sound of cars crashing could be heard above the sound of the radio and the babbling of my five month old baby in the back seat of my car. I looked toward the sound and saw a shower of glass falling on two cars across the busy street. Without thinking, I parked my car on the shoulder, locked it, and ran across the street.

In the driver’s seat of the car closer to me was a young woman with a gash on her forehead that matched the curve of the steering wheel. I looked around to see who else was there to help. A young man looking dazed and confused walked toward me. I asked him if he was involved in the accident. He said he was not involved, so I told him to call the police and ask for an ambulance. He looked confused. I pointed to the store across the street and told him they had a phone and he should go use it. I turned back to the driver, kept her talking, and prayed for her.

About then another man approached. He had a bloody forehead and was obviously in shock. The other driver. I told him to sit down and stay put.

A few minutes later emergency workers arrived. I left.

When I got back to my car my baby was happily cooing in his car seat. We left and went about our business.

Looking back, if I had thought about what was happening I would have driven by and not stopped to help. I had a baby with me. What was I thinking?

Many days later I was with some friends from church. One of them mentioned seeing me as she drove by the accident. Her response was to pray for the people involved and for me.  I credit my calmness in the situation, and the safety of my baby, to God acting on my behalf in part because of my friend praying.

Up to this point in my life, it had seemed obvious to me to pray for those in ugly situations.  The lesson for me was that I should respond to every situation with prayer and pray for everyone in the situation. Specifically, I should pray for the people involved, and also for the people providing immediate help, the people who will provide ongoing care, and the many people who will have opportunities to serve and offer grace to people in need.

Homework Due 10/18 and 10/19

For the past couple of weeks, I have handed out tickets to be entered in a drawing mid-semester.  Each week each student gets a raffle ticket if he or she has everything turned in. About mid-semester the tickets will be collected and there will be a drawing for prizes valued somewhere between zero and million dollars (probably closer to zero).  Winners will be announced here!

Math for the Middle Grades:  Lessons 16-18.  Also due on 10/19 is “Chapter 1 Review” in the Homework (HW) section of your binder.   It’s two sheets of paper.  The first sheet is printed on both sides, and the second sheet is printed on one side.  This assignment is to be completed at home, but not scored.  Turn in the Chapter 1 Review unscored.

This week we talked about square numbers. Knowing square numbers is useful, especially in algebra.

  • Practice by squaring 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc. For example, I say “7” and you say “49”.
  • Practice by saying a square number, then giving the number that was squared to get it (square root).  For example, I say “81” and you say “9”.
  • Practice listing the square numbers.  Say, “1, 4, 9, 16, 25…” up to 400.

1 x 1 = 1            5 x 5 = 25             9 x 9 = 81                       13 x 13 = 169             17 x 17 = 289
2 x 2 = 4            6 x 6 = 36             10 x 10 = 100                 14 x 14 = 196             18 x 18 = 324
3 x 3 = 9            7 x 7 = 49             11 x 11 = 121                 15 x 15 = 225             19 x 19 = 361
4 x 4 = 16          8 x 8 = 64             12 x 12 = 144                 16 x 16 = 256             20 x 20 = 400

Math 76:  

  • Lesson 20 only the practice problems (done in class)
  • Lesson 21 only the practice problems (done in class)
  • Lesson 23 fraction activity questions a-p
  • Lesson 24 practice (done in class) and odd numbered problems
  • Lesson 25 fraction activity questions a-r and odd numbered problems
  • Lesson 26 practice (done in class) and odd numbered problems
  • Test 2

The fraction manipulatives needed for lessons 23 and 25 were handed out today.  Cut them out and keep them in a bag in your math binder so we can continue to use them.  Also, a score key for lessons 1- 67 was handed out today.

Be sure to email Mrs. Sands if you have any questions about your homework.

Algebra 1/2:  Lessons 26-30

Algebra 1:  Lessons 26-30

Algebra 2:  Lessons 26-30, Test 4

Geometry:  Sections 4:3 and 4:4, and test 3 if you haven’t already turned it in.

How Many Donuts Does Each Person Get?

One day in the grocery store, the eternally perplexing question of hot dogs and buns came up. At that time, hot dogs usually came in packages of eight, buns in packages of six.  Why?  Maybe someday I’ll do that research.  At the time the question was “What is the minimum number of packages of hot dogs and buns we could buy in order to have the same number of each?” Toby, who was about eight years old, quickly figured out the answer and explained how he got it.

When my children were young we would occasionally get donuts from Cub Foods. Donuts came in a box of twelve. There were eight of us. Before the kids could eat the doughnuts, the current four or five-year-old had to figure out how many donuts each of us could have. He or she also had to explain how to get the answer.  Sometimes I extended the problem for the older children by asking how to share fifteen or three donuts among the eight of us.

My children have helped with grocery shopping since they were very small.  (Did you know three-year-olds can be capable grocery baggers?)  We check the price per unit on the shelf tag at the grocery store.  If the store does not provide the information, we figure out the price per unit or at least the relative price per unit.  We have discussions about which size box of cereal is a better buy for us, or how to compare prices when one tag lists price per ounce of juice and another lists price per juice bag.

Least common multiples, fractions, and price per unit are topics found in math books near the end of elementary school.  Why would I introduce these concepts to my children at much younger ages?  Talking about and playing with numbers and math is how children understand and learn and it’s more fun to learn in real life than from a book.  It’s amazing how much effort a child will exert to get a donut!

Homework Due 10/11 and 10/12

Math for the Middle Grades – Lessons 13-15.

Be sure to continue practicing the multiplication facts assigned each week.  This week we’re finishing up by looking at the last 15 facts.  Work on the ones you can’t answer instantly. Try focusing on three facts per day.  Write the day’s multiplication facts on an index card and keep it in your pocket.  Look at it many times throughout the day.

3 x 3 = 9                     6 x 6 = 36                     7 x 7 = 49                 8 x 8 = 64
3 x 6 = 18                   6 x 7 = 42                     7 x 8 = 56                 8 x 9 = 72
3 x 7 = 21                   6 x 8 = 48                     7 x 9 = 63                 9 x 9 = 81
3 x 8 = 24                   6 x 9 = 54
3 x 9 = 27

Math 76 – Lessons 17-19.  To maximize learning, be sure you complete one lesson at a time. That means do the problems, score the lesson, correct all errors, email Mrs. Sands for help if you need it, write your score at the top of the first page of the lesson, then move on to the next lesson.  If you are waiting for a response from Mrs. Sands move on to the next lesson.

There are 20 points possible on each lesson. Five points are for the practice problems we do in class.  The other 15 are for the odd-numbered problems in the problem set.  A problem is correct if you got it right the first time, or if you got it wrong then corrected it, or if you had to get help with a problem to correct it.  Write your score as a fraction:  number correct over 20.

Algebra 1/2, Algebra 1, Algebra 2 – Lessons 21-25 and test 4.  Algebra 2 students may turn in test 4 on 10/12 or 10/19.

Algebra 1/2 and Algebra 1 students got their scored tests back this week.  If you want a higher score on a test, check for the procedure on the blue sheet.

To maximize learning, be sure you complete one lesson at a time. That means do the problems, score the lesson, correct all errors, email Mrs. Sands for help if you need it, write your score at the top of the first page of the lesson, then move on to the next lesson.  If you are waiting for a response from Mrs. Sands move on to the next lesson.

There are 20 points possible on each lesson. Five points are for the practice problems we do in class.  The other 15 are for the odd-numbered problems in the problem set.  A problem is correct if you got it right the first time, or if you got it wrong then corrected it, or if you had to get help with a problem to correct it.  Write your score as a fraction:  number correct over 20.

Geometry – Lessons 4:1, 4:2 and test 3.

Pencil Snob

Pencils and paper, pens and a stapler . . .  These are a few of my favorite things!  The wall of pens and pencils at Office Max makes me smile.  The seasonal school supply department at Target makes me giddy.  Even the relatively small selection of office supplies at Hy-Vee is a reason for me to stop and gawk.  As much as I love a new pencil with a fresh eraser, or a three-ring binder full of graph paper, there are other things I don’t like.  Not all school supplies are of equal value. Some are wonderful, useful tools, and others just don’t do what they are supposed to do.

I love Dixon Ticonderoga pencils.  They write smoothly, erase easily, and sharpen to a beautiful point.  At Costco they come in a box of ninety-six.  That new box always feels like a lifetime supply.  I must be a cat.

There are many Dixon Ticonderoga enthusiasts.  We are sometimes referred to as pencil snobs and we wear the title with pride.  We love our Ticonderoga pencils, and we want to share the joy with everyone!

A student struggling with her pencil is an opportunity for conversion.  While working with a student her pencil lead broke.  I gave her a Ticonderoga and she continued writing.  A moment later she erased something.  Her mother, who had been quietly observing, exclaimed, “It erased everything so easily!”  Another convert.

When I find other pencils in my home I usually just throw them away.  While it seems wasteful, I believe it’s wasteful to provide inferior tools to our children, and ourselves, and expect excellent work.  Excellent tools make it easier to produce high-quality work. Excellent tools make it more likely we will enjoy our work and therefore invest more effort and more time.  When I find other supplies I love as much as my Dixon Ticonderoga pencils I’ll be sure to let you know.  What tools have you used that exceeded your expectations?